Simple linen top – Jalie 3905 Gisele

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Full disclaimer here! This is totally inspired by Stephanie,  thepetitesewist on Instagram,  and is a complete copy of the garment she made.

I was patrolling the eye wateringly expensive linens on Minerva during one of their 30% off weekends when I came across this so simple but so effective top made up by Stephanie in Robert Kaufman linen. I wanted a couple of longer sleeved but light weight tops for a very sunny holiday booked for the end of March and this fitted the bill.

The Gisele by Jalie Patterns is a simple bound scoop neck top for wovens with key hole back. The pattern covers 28 sizes from young girl to a 51’’ bust.

The front is slightly shorter than the back with a short side slit.

There is a choice of sleeves, the longer of which has elastic to make it a gentle bishop sleeve

There are no bust darts so it is quite boxy. A drapey fabric therefore a must.

I’m a 34’’ bust so went with the size S (for the 34’’ bust). Next time I would consider going up a size and also adding a bust dart which will give me a little more room across the back. It is perfect when wearing it. It just feels a little snug getting it on.

I just loved the simplicity of it and will look forward to wearing it with a pair of denim shorts on holiday. It’ll be equally perfect for the office in the summer

I’ve grown to love a classic style. This meets that aesthetic.

The fabric is beautifully soft but still with the structure of a fine linen. The pattern required 1.4m for this view but I mistakenly only ordered 1m which was the perfect amount. I did have to use the selvedge within my seam allowance, though, so a size greater than size S will take the recommended amount.

It was a very quick (for me) sew. It went together beautifully. I didn’t have to make my usual narrow shoulder adjustment.

The instructions for the split hem were so good! Next time I would lengthen the hemmed section 1 inch both front and back, therefore also lengthening the slit.

I wasn’t sure about the visible binding around the neck; but love it, now it is finished. It would be very plain without it.

To prolong the life of this garment in this expensive linen, I used French seams throughout. I would definitely make this again in a patterned lawn or embroidered cotton.

Expect more holiday wardrobe coming next!

Love, Lucie xx

12 comments

  1. Your top is everything a great garment should be – simple, well made, well fitting, beautiful fabric, and a lovely versatile style. Thank you for sharing it, and enjoy your top!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Nice top! I know it is ‘not done’ to incorporate the selvedge in the seam allowance, but I do it often, for instance when I make a button placket. It’s the best way to insure that you cut on the grain. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  3. A lovely classic top!
    Do you have a ‘trick’ to making your rouleau loops? (My nemesis! I am apparently attracted to patterns with them – think Remy – and I have LOTS of room for improvement!) Was it difficult to insert the rouleau in the visible binding?
    How did you find the Jalie directions overall? Their pattern format is similar to Style Arc’s, whose directions are a bit sparse for me sometimes.
    The selvedge issue is interesting. I was also “raised” 🤣 to avoid the selvedge, but I admit to a bit of naughtiness here!
    As always, thanks for all of your informative posts!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi there. I didn’t ‘rouleau’ them. Didn’t even try 🤣. Just folded over a narrow piece of fabric, like a v narrow bias binding and top stitched down. Inserting in the visible binding was straight forward, following the clear diagrams. I find Jalie instructions just sufficient but I’ve done most things before 😉

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  4. This looks lovely, and thanks for your comments, especially that you did not need to adjust for narrow shoulders. I may have to give this a try. I’m also a 34″ bust so I will take your recommendation and make a size up. I’ve just started sewing again after a 30 year hiatus and I find your projects inspiring.

    Liked by 1 person

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