Flat butt

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Who knew that I had a flat bum? Well I’m not quite sure if it’s a flat bum or a low bum or a muscular bum but I have the tell tale lines in my trousers under my bum to prove it. I’m going with muscular 😉

These are the Ultimate Trousers from Sew Over It. The Ultimate Trousers is the second pattern that comes with the Ultimate Guide to Trouser Fitting Online course. I wasn’t too impressed by the course but I’ll save that review for another post.

My quest for learning and nailing trouser fitting comes from my need for properly fitting reasonably priced trousers for work. I’m a manager in Construction. Although based at head office I can be called to a site at anytime. I therefore wear trousers every single day. Sometimes a day filled with office meetings with Clients (smart attire required) can quickly change to the need to visit a muddy site. Therefore my trousers need to be smart, comfortable (because I’m of an age where comfort comes before EVERYTHING) and washable.

Personally, I have found cheap trousers itchy and to put bluntly – sweaty.

I prefer tailored narrow legged trousers as trousers billowing out, tucked into site boot socks, makes me look like a pirate.

My waist can swell an inch or so and so I like to have few options.

I have ordered online and sent back soooo many pairs, usually fitting between sizes or finding some other fitting issue. I despise real life trouser shopping and would rather hoover out my car.

So back to the Ultimates. I used a stashed stretch cotton for this toile.

This is a size 10, graded to a size 12 at the waist. Hmmmm.

So I unpicked and re cut to a size 8, pinched the waist darts a little further, inserted a rather amazing invisible zip and waist facing. And then I ended up with this.

Ha!!! Fooled you!!!

It really wasn’t that easy. I used every ounce of patience to get to this point. My unpicker is almost blunt. I must have read 10 differing pieces of trouser fitting advice. And every bit of advice works……for the person it is fitted too.

The first thing I noticed was that my front leg muscles are quite pronounced and were pulling the sides seam forward. I knew that this side seam should be pretty vertical. You can see where I’ve let out the front piece seam allowance to improve this.

But then the dreaded bagging crotch. Using some advice on a Closet Case Jeans fitting page  I took in the crotch as shown front and back

Low Butt Adjustment // 12 common jeans and pants adjustments // Closet Case Files

And then some more, and then some more.

I can’t take any in more. Using Patrick Grant’s words from Tuesday’s GBSB , my bum is just starting to look a little fabric hungry.

It worked a treat around the front but for the back I’ve got to this point without recutting/redrafting all four trouser pieces. Believe me, these are so much better than before the adjustment.

Next time I’m going to try this Style Arc advice

Flat Seat Adjustment - Step 4

Meanwhile, if I don’t show you the rear, these are my 85% Ultimate Trousers.

Comfy 85% Ultimate Trousers.

I’d love to know what you think of the bum fitting and if you think the Style Arc advice might work. Or alternatively do you think I’m just being too critical?

Love Lucie xx

19 comments

  1. Fab trousers! I saw GBSB this week too – Patrick’s ‘bum hungry’ made me laugh but it’s a great way to describe it! You have a lot of patience to measure, try on, snip, try on again, fit again, and so on – but definitely worth it!

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  2. are you comfortable sitting in them? if so its a winner in my book. Trousers are the worst thing to fit on my body. Looking at you I realise I too have muscular front thighs and have never thought of this before. I know my pelvis is way out of level .

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, they are comfy. And they look better than some of my RTW trousers, so that’s a win in my book! I have learnt an awful lot making these, including how I seem to stand with my tailbone tucked in. It explains why so many RTW trousers pool at the base of my bum!

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  3. It’s just the sort of faff that puts you off dressmaking isn’t it? I actually find getting RTW trousers (especially jeans) relatively easy so it makes me wonder why I bother at all. Still, I love the sense of satisfaction it gives you and I think your trousers look very wearable and nobody else will have a pair like them. I made these last year and blogged about them here https://wp.me/pBcZZ-1Kc – I think you were missing in action around that time. I found the most useful thing was being pinned in to them by the teacher at a local sewing class and altering the pattern to make a block which had me as an 8, a 10 and a 12 all in one garment. So, as long as I don’t put on or lose any weight and use the same sort of fabric I’ll be fine if I make another pair. My daughter did the Ultimate Trousers workshop in the actual shop and enjoyed it so I’ll be interested to hear your comments about the online class.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Just checked out your post. They really are beautiful!! I wish I had access to a fitter/teacher/at the weekend.
      I am also inspired by the challenge itself and this one is one I’m determined to win! I thought I was giving myself an advantage using the stretch cotton but, reading another comment down below, maybe not.
      There are so many factors involved aren’t there? The pattern, the style, the material, how full/slim you are feeling on the day. I can see that every pair of future trousers are going to require fitting. Unless I stick to exactly the same thing!!

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  4. I hate trouser shopping too as they never fit properly. I’m nervous about making them and have read every piece of advice on I can find on the internet – pinterest, youtube, the lot. I have come round to thinking that the best way (and most cost effective way) in the long term will be to learn to pattern make and am joining a class where they teach you to use pattern blocks. Hopefully this will save on wasted patterns, material and time.

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  5. Well firstly yes maybe you are being a little over critical because they really don’t look that bad 🙂 secondly, there is a theory that the whole “scooping the crotch” to fix a problem is not the way to do it; and if you do scoop the crotch then you need to compensate for that by adding to the side seams. Try the style arc method too. I think that making trousers in stretch cotton will result in lines and wrinkles and bagging out with wear…it’s just how stretch fabric is unless you go for something quite firm. What about trying these in something like a stretch wool? Or stretch suiting of some kind? Unfortunately making trousers to fit is just a process of tweaking each version. You are 85% of the way there! And I bet these are better than buying RTW. Don’t give up!

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    1. I’d not thought that using stretch might me hindering me, but I see your point. The comments I’ve received on Facebook also support your theory that scooping the crotch isn’t the answer. I’m determined to carry on and improve them. I shall be trying the Style Arc method next!

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  6. I’d never thought of getting creases at the back like that but I notice that my RTW cord jeans have some when I wear them. Comfy though! When I made trousers I made loose ones in poly-cotton so much easier and I never even looked at the back. Maybe I should. 🙂 Yours are very pretty.

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    1. I hope I’ve not made everyone paranoid about their smiley bum creases!! I think that for some of us, when we get older we loose that rounded shape. That’s probably why I’ve having more and more trouble buying them.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I share your pain! I’m not sure of what to call my particular fitting issues – my tutor would say it doesn’t matter as you fit the body. Sadly, even with help, I’m not there yet. I’m sure you will be happier with your next pair. I think how long you go on depends on how much patience you have and how self critical/perfectionist you are. Sadly, I’m quite a perfectionist, trying to be less so when it’s not really a matter of life and death!

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  8. I have a much bigger hip to waist ratio so I like to make my own trousers in the same style as yours but not that pattern. I put a piece of wide elastic about 2 inches long in the waist band at the back which doesn’t make a gathered bum but does mean that they are close fitting on the waist when I stand and allows for some movement when sitting down, I would say they are a very good fitting pair and although I know you to be a perfectionist the behaviour of different fabrics is always going to be against you so you will always need to adjust each pair. I think they are great trousers and the test is: if you tried them on in a shop would you buy them? If the answer is yes then you have won! Jo xx

    Liked by 1 person

    1. What pattern do you use? Good tip about the short piece of elastic.
      And yes, I’ve come to the conclusion that getting the fit right in these will not transform all future trouser making which is a bit depressing!! I want to move onto a fly front next; this is going to be a long old journey. But one I think will be worthwhile once I’ve got 2 or 3 patterns more or less nailed.

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  9. Hiya, just found this via the Foldline FB group. I think these are looking pretty good and I agree with the suggestions of the other commenters. I’m a fully paid-up member of the flat butt society so I feel your pain and I’m forever fiddling with crotch scooping and the like.
    There is one more thing you could try that is more related to your front thighs but could impact the slight back leg wrinkles…It’s something that is done on Burda patterns and I don’t know if it’s mentioned on the pattern that you’re using here, but often there is a smidge more length on the front leg from crotch to just above the knee and you subtly ease the front leg onto the back leg. This could potentially remove a little of the excess back length that you see below your bum as well as trying the fish eye dart

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